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Unwritten Rules

newbie tips

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6 replies to this topic

#1
JacobHeidenreich

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Hello, my wife and I have played a number of games of Arkham Horror LCG and we usually get the stuffing knocked out of us. Having played Magic, Netrunner, and other games for awhile, I know there are usually 'unwritten rules' to these games. Do you always want to keep a hand full of cards (like the runners in Netrunner)? Never split the party (like in D&D)? Should you just expect to have to play a scenario through several times before getting anything other than the worst possible outcome? What are things you need to do that aren't in the rules? 

For example, I always thought of 'evading' as simply a way to run away from an enemy. But, after a few games, I realized that it takes away the opponent's next action. So, if you evade and then stay at the location and attack (twice, if lucky) you can do damage without taking it (for that turn, at least). What are other tips?


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#2
phillosmaster

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If you want to succeed at a skill test on standard difficulty then on average you want a +2 going into the skill check.  If you absolutely need to pass a check then you want a +4.  You always have a chance to lose a skill check so figure out your failure options before going into the check to make sure you don't overcommit and put yourself into a real bad state.

 

Make sure you understand how mulligan rules work in this game because they are more generous than most card games.  In addition if you want to ensure you get a particular type of thing in your opening hand then adding around 5 cards in that category get's you close to 100% probability of capturing at least one of those cards on with the mulligan.  Where this is most relevant is getting a weapon in your opening hand (for example for Skids I include 2x machete, 2x .45, 1x .41).  Also it's pretty significant for Daisy with Tomes.  For Daisy I include 2x Old Book Of Lore, 1x Medical Text and 2x Research Librarian to make sure I get a tome in my starting hand.  Of course there is still a chance you won't hit a target card even with the mulligan, but this really stacks the odds in your favor.

 

If an enemy you are engaged with is at a location you can just leave (because you don't need to investigate there anymore) and you have a good chance to evade then just attempt to evade it. It's usually more economical to just evade the enemy and move away rather than waste ammo and combat cards.  This is contingent on the enemy not being a hunter of course.



#3
BDFlory

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"Losing" a scenario isn't the end of the world. You might get some trauma for defeat, or negative consequences for resigning, but in campaign play, you only win or lose at the end of the campaign. You can also survive without winning or losing, at least in the core box campaign.

#4
Khudzlin

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If an enemy you are engaged with is at a location you can just leave (because you don't need to investigate there anymore) and you have a good chance to evade then just attempt to evade it. It's usually more economical to just evade the enemy and move away rather than waste ammo and combat cards.  This is contingent on the enemy not being a hunter of course.

 

Exhausted enemies do not move for Hunter. Neither do they make any attacks (including attacks of opportunity). So evading Hunter enemies is just as economical as evading non-Hunter enemies (if not more).

 

It does make sense to split the party somewhat, but not to get very far from each other (depending on the scenario, it might not even be possible). Massive enemies hit everyone in their location, for instance (and since they're bosses, they usually hit hard).



#5
JacobHeidenreich

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Thanks! Evade sounds more powerful than I thought. Also, I underestimated the importance of weapons (relevant to things like investigate-enablers) and the idea of mulligan-ing to get one



#6
phillosmaster

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I disagree Khudzlin.  If you can kill a hunter it's better to just be done with it in most situations.  Sure evade it if that makes sense in the moment, but this thread was asking for unwritten rules.  I'd say evading a non-hunter in a useless location falls under that.  Evading a hunter though is going to require more information about the details of your scenario to say that's an actual economic move.  Sure you delay them a turn, but they are going to continue to hound you so you need to weigh your variables there, which is why I put in that caveat. 



#7
Khudzlin

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I'd say you always need to weigh your variables, though it's easier in some cases than others. In the case of "evading an enemy", one of the variables is the presence of other players and what they can do about that enemy.

 

Another rule to remember: players can take their turns in any order. It can be a big help.







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